MOVIE REVIEW – ‘Get Him to the Greek’

Written by J.T. Johnson

4-stars

DIRECTOR: Nicholas Stoller
CINEMATOGRAPHY: Robert Yeoman
WRITER: Nicholas Stoller
MUSIC: Lyle Workman

“Get Him to the Greek” is director Nicholas Stoller’s hilarious follow-up to the hit comedy, “Forgetting Sarah Marshall”. Russell Brand returns as Aldous Snow, the character he played in “Marshall”. Jonah Hill plays an up-and-coming intern at a record company, a character different from the one he played in the previous movie.

Aldous is no longer on the wagon after the failure of his latest album, “African Child”. After hitting rock bottom, the musician now drinks anything put in front of him and does every type of drug imaginable. Sergio (Sean “Diddy” Combs) is looking for ideas for his record company that is losing money. One of the people he needs ideas from is the up-and-coming intern played by Hill named Aaron Green.

Luckily, it’s been ten years since Aldous gave a famous performance at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles. After Aaron proposes that Aldous play an anniversary show there, Sergio sends him to get Aldous and take care of the rock star until he does the concert. This is where the film really begins.

With all of the crazy misadventures and attempts to rein Aldous in, it is the two actors playing the leads that really stand-out. Hill has already proven himself in films such as “Superbad” and “Knocked Up”. Brand was one of the funniest characters found in “Marshall” and is a proven stand-up. It was wise of the studio to let these two comedy titans just bounce off each other.

Sometimes, it is just better to go along for the ride and not restrict certain actors to some sort of PG-13 rating. Hill and Brand work exceedingly well together and they make this movie worth it all by themselves. Like most Judd Apatow produced movies, though, they don’t have to do it alone.

There are several cameos found throughout the film such as Meredith Vieira, Lars Ulrich and Pink. Even Kristen Bell returns as Sarah Marshall in a television advertisement for her new show, “Blind Medicine” with Rick Schroder. The biggest standout this time, however, is Combs as Sergio.

Here, Combs proves that he has great comedic timing and knows how to make the audience laugh. Every time he is on screen, it becomes a memorable moment that will be discussed once the film is over. He even takes the time to make fun of his own image a couple of times.

Films that end up being raunchy but also work with the audience are usually the ones that also have a heart underneath. The characters may be dirty, but they have real problems that people can relate to. Aaron is trying to figure how to work things out in his life and make his way in the world along with his girlfriend, Daphne (Elisabeth Moss). Aldous, on the other hand, is depressed because his girlfriend has left him along with their son, Naples. He also has long-standing issues with his dad.

The movie’s only issue is that it can move a little too fast. There are times where the movie could have hit more upon some of the characters problems, but it decides to breeze through these moments until later in the film. Also, there are too many party scenes. Granted, this is a film about following around a rock star and parties are an inevitable consequence of that, but some of them interrupt the greater story and end up being detrimental to the flow of the film.

Despite the film’s narrative flaws, Hill and Brand keep the humor alive. With additional help from the supporting cast, including Combs, “Get Him to the Greek” ends up being one of the funniest comedies to be released so far this year.

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